Housekeeping Jobs In Singapore.... Click Here To Apply....

URGENT FREE JOB RECRUITMENT FOR SINGAPORE.
LOCATION : SINGAPORE.
we is an online job site. Here you can find work opportunities in anywhere. By searching through thousands of vacancy listings or browsing job offers classified by industry.
We are not an employment agency we merely offer  an opportunity to post a free vacancy listing on our website and allow job seekers to effectively find the posted job offer and apply for that position.
We Are Provide Jobs For Your Better  Future…. And we always provide genuine 100% real jobs. You do not pay to apply for this job. It is always Free….
Salary : 1500 USD TO 2500 USD
Job Type : Full Time / Half Time
No Experience Wanted
High School Qualification
 Age : 21 to 45
 How To Apply ?

  To Apply, Each Candidates has to read the details first and must fill given criteria. 
The Submit Button / Link is Provided Below. Click On The Link Given Below and fill up the form. 

Click The Below Link To Apply....





    Document Needed : 
1.           Latest CV. / Resume.
2.           Photograph
Only Selected Candidates Will be called for Interview.

Valid Passport & Document
Note : For Applying the job please go through the insructions.  and read the instruction carefully, fill up your details, submit us your Resume so that we can know you. We will email you once you are approved. Thank you.
 By using this site you agree to the following: we provides a free service which should be accepted as is. All the job information is provided by the respective employers, we are not responsible for the accuracy of the information like salary, job requirements and description. Under no circumstances will responsible for any direct or indirect loss resulting from the use of our website and services.In 1299, according to the Malay Annals, the Kingdom of Singapura was founded on the island by Sang Nila Utama. Although the historicity of the accounts as given in the Malay Annals is the subject of academic debates, it is nevertheless known from various documents that Singapore in the 14th century, then known as Temasek, was a trading port under the influence of both the Majapahit Empire and the Siamesekingdoms inside Indosphere of Greater India.  These Indianized Kingdoms, a term coined by George Cœdès, were characterized by surprising resilience, political integrity and administrative stability. Historical sources also indicate that around the end of the 14th century, its ruler Parameswara was attacked by either the Majapahit or the Siamese, forcing him to move on to Melaka where he founded the Sultanate of Malacca. Archaeological evidence suggests that the main settlement on Fort Canning was abandoned around this time, although a small trading settlement continued in Singapore for some time afterwards. In 1613, Portuguese raiders burned down the settlement, which by then was nominally part of the Johor Sultanate. The wider maritime region and much of the trade was under Dutch control for the following period.




Thomas Stamford Raffles arrived in 1819 and signed a treaty with Sultan Hussein Shah of Johor, on behalf of the British East India Company, to develop the southern part of Singapore as a British trading post. In 1824 the entire island, as well as the Temenggong, became a British possession after a further treaty with the Sultan. In 1826, Singapore became part of the Straits Settlements, under the jurisdiction of British India, becoming the regional capital in 1836. Prior to Raffles' arrival, there were only about a thousand people living on the island, mostly indigenous Malays along with a handful of Chinese. By 1860 the population had swelled to over 80,000, more than half being Chinese. Many of these early immigrants came to work on the pepper and gambier plantations. Later, in the 1890s, when the rubber industry also became established in Malaya and Singapore, the island became a global centre for rubber sorting and export.
After the First World War, the British built the large Singapore Naval Base as part of the defensive Singapore strategy. During the Second World War, the Imperial Japanese Army invaded British Malaya, culminating in the Battle of Singapore. When the British force of 60,000 troops surrendered on 15 February 1942, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill called the defeat "the worst disaster and largest capitulation in British history. Between 5,000 and 25,000 ethnic Chinese people were killed in the subsequent Sook Ching massacre. The Japanese occupied Singapore until the British repossessed it in September 1945, after the Surrender of Japan.
The story of Singapore as we know it today began in 1819, when Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles made a deal with a claimant to the throne of the Sultanate of Johor: the British would support his claim in exchange for the right to set up a trading post on the island.
Though the Dutch initially protested, the signing of the Anglo-Dutch treaty in 1824, which separated the Malay world into British and Dutch spheres of influence (resulting in the current Malaysia-Indonesia and Singapore-Indonesia borders), ended the conflict. The Dutch renounced their claim to Singapore and ceded their colony in Malacca to the British, in exchange for the British ceding their colonies on Sumatra to the Dutch.




Well-placed at the entrance to the Straits of Malacca, straddling the trade routes between China, India, Europe, and Australia, Raffles' master stroke was to declare Singapore a free port, with no duties charged on trade. As traders flocked to escape onerous Dutch taxes, the trading post soon grew into one of Asia's busiest, drawing people from far and wide. Along with Penang and Malacca, Singapore became one of the Straits Settlements and a jewel in the British colonial crown. Its economic fortunes received a further boost when palm oil and rubber from neighbouring Malaya were processed and shipped out via Singapore.
In 1867, Singapore was formally split off from British India and made into a directly ruled Crown Colony.
When World War II broke out, Fortress Singapore was seen as a formidable British base, with massive naval fortifications guarding against assault by sea. However, not only did the fortress lack a fleet, as all ships were tied up defending Britain from the Germans, but the Japanese wisely chose to cross Malaya by bicycle instead!
Despite hastily turning the guns around, this was something the sea-focused British commanders had not considered, and on 15 Feb 1942, with supplies critically low after less than a week of fighting, Singapore was forced to surrender. The British prisoners of war were packed off to Changi Prison. Tens of thousands perished in the subsequent brutal Japanese occupation. The return of the British in 1945 to one of their most favoured colonies was triumphalist.
Granted self-rule in 1955, Singapore briefly joined the Malaysian Federation in 1963 when the British left, but was expelled because the Chinese-majority city was seen as a threat to Malay dominance. The island became independent on 9 August 1965, thus becoming the only country to gain independence against its own will in the history of the modern world!
The subsequent forty years rule by Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew saw Singapore's economy boom, with the country rapidly becoming one of the wealthiest and most 




developed in Asia despite its lack of natural resources, earning it a place as one of the four East Asian Tigers. Now led by Lee's son Lee Hsien Loong, the ruling People's Action Party (PAP) continues to dominate the political scene with 81 out of 87 seats in Parliament. Societal restrictions have been loosened up in recent years though, with the government trying to shake off its staid image, and it remains to be seen how the delicate balancing act between political control and social freedom will play out.
Singapore traditionally has one of the lowest unemployment rates among developed countries. The unemployment rate did not exceed 4% from 2005 to 2014, hitting highs of 3.1% in 2005 and 3% during the 2009 global financial crisis; it fell to 1.8% in the first quarter of 2015.
The government provides numerous assistance programmes to the homeless and needy through the Ministry of Social and Family Development, so acute poverty is rare. Some of the programmes include providing between SGD400 and SGD1000 per month to needy households, providing free medical care at government hospitals, and paying for children's school fees. The Singapore government also provides numerous benefits to its citizenry, including: free money to encourage residents to exercise in public gyms, up to $166,000 worth of baby bonus benefits for each baby born to a citizen, heavily subsidised healthcare, money to help the disabled, cheap laptops for poor students, rebates for numerous areas such as public transport, utility bills and more.
Although it has been recognised that foreign workers are crucial to the country's economy, the government is considering capping these workers, as foreign workers make up 80% of the construction industry and up to 50% of the service industry. The Immigrations and Checkpoints authority publishes a number of criteria for eliegibility for permanent residence
Information and communications technologies (ICT) is one of the pillars of Singapore's economic success. However, Singapore's mass communications networks, including television and phone networks, have long been operated by the government. 

Comments

  1. Am interested about the job and i can get you more people from Ghana my whatspp number is 002330506055769

    ReplyDelete
  2. Good information, thanks for sharing. This article really helps. I was looking for the best housekeeping services.

    Hemstäd Nacka

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

QATAR CAREERS 2021

Fresher Jobs In Dubai 2021

Jobs In Dubai 2021